What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

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Day 1 in Dublin

Dublin city is divided into several quarters. So, in order to compactly visit as many attractions as possible try to go to the places of interest that are close to each other and are found in the same quarter.

We recommend to those who are on their first trip in Dublin to get an overall view over the city before starting in detail to visit the tourist attractions. The best way to do it is to take a tour in the Guinness Storehouse. This is the house of the Guinness beer, the most successful export product in Ireland. The 7-storey building, situated in St. James’s Gate, was opened for the public in 2000.

During the tour, you will find out more about how beer is prepared: the ingredients, the techniques of brewing, methods of advertising and other. Also, you will find out how the perfect pint of beer is poured, and you will have the possibility to try to pour your own perfect pint of beer, which you can drink later. In the end, on the seventh floor of the building, there is an atrium from where you can view Dublin’s panorama, at 360 degrees! Warning! We proposed you to visit the Guinness Storehouse first for the panoramic view over the city, and not for getting drunk right at the beginning of your trip!

The Guinness Storehouse Brewery at St. James Gate. Guinness brewery was founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness | What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

The Guinness Storehouse Brewery at St. James Gate. Guinness brewery was founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness / Copyright littleny

Take a walk to St. Patrick’s Cathedral, which is located in the oldest part of the city – the Medieval Quarter. The tallest and the largest church from Ireland served, in 1783-1871, to the St. Patrick Order, but now it is a location for national public ceremonies. The most famous office holder of the cathedral was Jonathan Swift, the writer of the “Gulliver’s Travels”, whose tomb is found on the site of the church. In fact, there are lots of notorious people buried on the site, both under the cathedral’s floor and in the graveyard, outside, some of them being Michael Boyle, Adam Loftus – the first Provost of Trinity College, and many archbishops of Dublin.

Take a walk to St. Patrick's Cathedral, which is located in the oldest part of the city – the Medieval Quarter | What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

Take a walk to St. Patrick’s Cathedral, which is located in the oldest part of the city – the Medieval Quarter / Copyright Shahid Khan

On your way to the second cathedral, visit the Dublin Castle, which includes important landmarks like the famous tower of the castle, the crypt, and the site where a Viking fortress was discovered. The Dublin Castle fulfilled a number of roles through its history. Originally built as a defensive fortification for the Norman city of Dublin, it later evolved into a royal residence, currently being a major Irish government complex. The castle complex also hosts the Chester Beatty Library, in a purpose-constructed facility.

Visit the Dublin Castle | What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

Visit the Dublin Castle / Copyright Matej Hudovernik

The second old cathedral of Dublin is the Christ Church Cathedral – the mother of all cathedrals and churches from Ireland! It contains the largest crypt that has been ever built in a cathedral from Great Britain or Ireland. The crypt was renovated at the beginning of 2000 and contains diverse monuments and historical objects such as the oldest secular sculptures from Ireland, a tabernacle, a set of old candles, historical books and goods of the Cathedral’s altar. In case you will be on Liffey River, the Christ Church is the only one of the three cathedrals which can be seen clearly from this angle.

Visit the Christ church cathedral | What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

Visit the Christ church cathedral / Copyright WayneDuguay

The Temple Bar area hosts the highest concentration of pubs, restaurants, and clubs in the city. Tourists say that Temple Bar is the most interesting side of the city, and you will understand why if you will drop into “Bob’s”, “Buskers”, or “Fitzsimon”. Here, you can try tasty traditional food, drink Irish beer and even listen to Irish folk music. This is one of the quickest ways to get to know the Irish culture! However, Dublin has its rules and the locals ask the tourists to respect these rules. For example, the restaurants usually mention in their menus the amount of money which has to be paid to those who serve you, but if it is not specified explicitly then the tips have to represent about 10% from consumption.

Visit the Temple Bar District | What to Do in Dublin in 3 Days

Visit the Temple Bar District / Copyright POM POM

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