What to Do in Budapest in 3 Days

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Day 2 in Budapest

The next day, direct to the Gellert Hill, where the famous Citadella is located on the top. The road to the top of the hill is superb, being shadowed in summer by woods. This is considered a kind of fortress, strategically important in Budapest’s military history. The U-shaped Citadella spreads over almost the entire 235 meters high plateau, thus the construction being found at the highest altitude from the central Budapest. You can admire from here a breath-taking view over the Danube and its eight bridges.

Sunning aerial view over the capital of Hungary, Budapest | What to Do in Budapest in 3 Days

Sunning aerial view over the capital of Hungary, Budapest / Copyright Adam Zoltan

There are another interesting tourist attractions on the Gellert Hill, such as the outstanding Statue of Liberty. This statue can be seen wherever you are in the city. It represents a woman that holds in her hands a palm leaf and commemorates those who sacrificed their lives for the independence, freedom, and prosperity of Hungary. The statue is 14 meters tall, made of bronze, standing atop a 26 meters pedestal. Two smaller statues are near the main one, but the original monument consisted of two more elements, that were removed, and now are in the Memento Park.

Statue of Liberty on Gellert Hill, 26 meters pedestal in Budapest | What to Do in Budapest in 3 Days

Statue of Liberty on Gellert Hill, 26 meters pedestal in Budapest / Copyright Brian Kinney

A more unusual place, but not less interesting is the Gellert Hill Cave. This is a part of a network of caves where a hermit was living, and who is believed that used the thermal waters of a muddy lake next to the cave to heal sick people. Over time, the cave served as a chapel, a monastery, and even a field hospital for the army of Nazi Germany during World War II. Currently, the sacred place features many rooms, one of the most visited being that carved in hardwood. The place emanates mystery, complemented by striking neo-Gothic turrets.

Numerous vessels anchored on the Danube host small, yet very pleasant restaurants, where you can find traditional Hungarian, or international food. The Hungarian cuisine is not famous only for its soups and stews, seasoned abundantly with paprika, but also for its tasty, nourishing cakes and pies. After a satiating goulash and dessert, you will not want to do anything else, except perhaps dancing a Hungarian waltz, sentimentally interpreted by a fiddler, who will complete perfectly the romantic-bohemian atmosphere.

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